Eco-Industry · Farm Management · Community Groups · Courses · Consultancy · Chat Room · Contact Us
· Q & A Forum · Country Kitchen · Healthy House · Healthy Lifestyle · Kid's Pages

 


Please visit our great sponsors who keep this website open for you

     
How Rare Earth miner Lynas became a political football in Malaysia

Rare Earth Elements Uses

Electric Vehicles

Energy Efficiency in Transportation

Nissan Terra, Peugeot Onyx

Magnesium in the 21st Century: A Better Choice for Transportation

Liquid Fluoride Thorium Reactor Development

10-20MW Offshore Wind Turbines

From Fine Black Powder to Electric Motor:
Permanent Magnets

Rapid, Cost-Effective, 100% Recyclable Method to Produce Ultra-strong Magnets

Rare Earth New Band Magnetism

Magnetic Sheet Fanner

Trade-In/Upgrade Program for Magnetic Separators

Breakthrough Discovery in the Physics of Magnetism

Self-Cleaning Pneumatic Line Magnet

Quantum Rare Earth Developments

Magnetic Device Studied as Treatment for Heartburnand Acid Reflux

Drug Linked to Fewer Deaths Among Kidney Patients Undergoing Hemodialysis

Maintaining Bone Health Status of End-Stage Renal Disease

Powerful Superconductor in a Class All Its Own

Solar Cell Efficiency Research

Development of New Glass

Rare Earths studied by University of Alabama at Birmingham

World's Highest Engineering Prize

Rare Earths: National Security Concerns

Shortage of Rare Earth Minerals as early as 2015

China Rare Earth Market Trends

Emerging Nuclear Power Market Risks and China’s Possible Domination

First Heavy Rare Earths Processing Plant Outside China

Rare Earth Elements Excite Protein Probes

Rare Earth Metal and Cousin of Platinum is Attractive for Improving Flash Memory Chips

Paint Absorbs Corrosion-causing Chemicals

Research on Novel Compounds of Rare Earth Metals

Theory Aims to Describe Fundamental Properties of Materials

Technology Accelerates Solid-State Lighting

Tracking Phosphorus Runoff from Livestock Manure

World’s Hunger for Phosphorus

Monazite can act as Microscopic Clocks to Date Rock Formations

Rare Earth Minerals used in Fossil Research

New Geochemical Process Can Place Loose Fossils Back Into the Strata or Determine Fakes

Rare Earth used to determine "Terror Bird' Arrived in North America Before Land Bridge

Amorphous Steel:
Three Times Stronger and Non-magnetic

New Technology Could Help Thwart Nuclear Terrorism

Security, Geography Could Hinder Mining Investment in Afghanistan

Virginia Tech Patents

“Upstand” the Alternative to the Bicycle Kickstand

Mint Coins from Rare and Advanced Metals

Global E Waste

Rare Earth Recovery Technology

Reclaim Rare Earth Metals from Spent Fluorescent Lamps

Certified e-Waste Recyclers

Rare Earth Element ETF Promises Real Earning Potential

NYSSA Mining Conference Focuses on Microcap Companies

Brazil Lake Lithium and Rare Earth Metals Project

Mining Industry Sustainability Analysis and 2013

Global Scandium Market Analyzed

Solar Manufacturing Sells Vacuum Furnaces To Hitachi Metals

Strategic Metals Critical to National Defense

 

 

 


Magnetic Device Studied as Treatment for Heartburn and Acid Reflux

More than 20 million Americans suffer from gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), experienced by many as chronic heartburn. Medication offers short-term relief for some sufferers of this disease. For those seeking a non-prescription alternative, a magnetic device, currently being evaluated at UC San Diego Medical Center, may provide a long-term solution.

The device, called the LINX Reflux Management System, is being studied at UC San Diego Medical Center as part of a US and European multicenter clinical trial. Santiago Horgan, MD, director of minimally invasive surgery at UC San Diego Medical Center, is the site's principal investigator.

"The goal of this clinical trial is to correct a defect in the lower esophagus so that the body can function naturally without pain or discomfort," said Horgan, a national expert in laparoscopic and scarless surgical techniques.

GERD is a progressive disease resulting from a weak muscle in the lower esophagus, the organ which passes food to the stomach. When this muscle functions properly, it acts as a protective valve between the esophagus and the stomach, allowing food and liquid to pass, but preventing the reflux or back up of acidic stomach contents. In patients with GERD, the valve is weak or nonfunctional, allowing movement in the wrong direction. The result is often burning pain and ultimately damage to the digestive tract.

During a 20-30 minute minimally-invasive surgical procedure, the device, made up of a series of magnetic beads, is secured around the bottom of the esophagus. Once in place, the magnetic attraction between the beads supports the valve to protect the esophagus from reflux, while still allowing it to open during swallowing or to release gas. Made of permanent rare earth magnets encased in titanium, the band is sized to fit each patient.

"With medical therapy alone, the production of acid in the stomach is suppressed, but the actual problem of reflux remains. The most appropriate long-term therapy for GERD is to restore the body's physiological barrier to correct the cause of reflux itself," said Horgan, the first surgeon in the western United States to implant the device in this clinical trial.

"I decided to participate in this clinical trial surgery because it may be a permanent, structural way of addressing the problem," said Gina Levine, age 43, who has suffered from GERD for more than 18 years. "I like the minimally invasive approach to this procedure and that it can be reversed if necessary."

Levine and other sufferers of GERD experience daily symptoms of burning, gas and throat irritation. Other symptoms include regurgitation, chest pain, hoarseness, wheezing, and chronic cough.

Left untreated, GERD can lead to a variety of serious esophageal complications including inflammation, ulceration, or strictures. In addition, GERD patients are at risk to develop a pre-cancerous condition known as Barrett's esophagus.

The current multicenter clinical trial, sponsored by the device manufacturer Torax Medical, Inc. of Shoreview, Minnesota, will evaluate the safety and effectiveness of the device in up to 100 patients.

To qualify for this study, patients must have a history of reflux symptoms and must be taking GERD medications on a daily basis.

2/23/2009
University of California, San Diego

 

Copyright© 2012-2013, 1EarthMedia. All rights reserved